Oil Painting

James Fitzgerald
,
Rockwell Kent
,
Alice Kent Stoddard
Monhegan has been an artists’ destination since the 1850s, and in the early 1900s Rockwell Kent built a house and studio, owned later by James Fitzgerald. The studio represents work practice of three significant artists, having also been used by Alice Kent Stoddard, and the sites serve as touchstones to Monhegan’s multi-generational art colony.
John F. Peto Studio MuseumIsland Heights, NJ
John Frederick Peto
This is the home and studio of John Frederick Peto, the nineteenth century still–life painter and master of the trompe l’oeil style. Following a multi-year preservation project completed in 2011, the Peto-designed house, studio, and gardens are now presented as they looked during his lifetime. Visitors can compare the very furniture and artifacts that Peto owned with the paintings and photographs in which they appear.
Lee Krasner
,
Jackson Pollock
The former home and studio of two of America’s foremost abstract painters, a National Historic Landmark, preserves the environment that inspired them and contains evidence of their creative processes. Wearing special padded slippers, visitors walk on the studio floor covered with the brilliant colors and rhythmic gestures found in Pollock’s masterpieces. On the studio walls, evidence of Krasner’s dynamic painting technique is visible.
N. C. Wyeth
N. C. Wyeth spent much of his life and career here as one of the most successful illustrators of the first half of the 20th century. Experience the studio where Wyeth created many of his memorable works of art, and the home where he and his wife Carolyn raised their extraordinarily creative children. The dramatic space in which Wyeth worked reflects the robust, outsized personality that shaped his art. Standing in the main studio, one can easily imagine the great illustrator at work, creating characters that would become icons for generations of readers.
Grant Wood StudioCedar Rapids, IA
Grant Wood
Grant Wood lived and worked in here from 1924 to 1935, when he achieved his mature style. Visitors have the opportunity to stand where American Gothic was painted. The building itself was heavily modified by Grant Wood to feature more living space and unexpected but useful design features.

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