Modernism

Judd FoundationNew York, NY
Donald Clarence Judd
From 1968 until his death in 1994, the sculptor Donald Judd used this 1870 cast-iron loft building as his home and studio. Here he had the opportunity to demonstrate his ideas about art installation. Judd’s use of the building is seen as part of the rise of the SoHo artistic community in New York City.
Vance Kirkland
The Kirkland Museum of Fine & Decorative Art, housed in an historic Arts and Crafts style building, displays the work of abstract painter Vance Kirkland in vignettes composed of artwork by other Colorado artists, and a major collection of international decorative art from the modern era. Vance Kirkland’s studio space regularly inspires exclamations of awe from visitors, who are able to see his painting table and the straps Kirkland sometimes used to suspend himself above his paintings to create his large oil paint and water compositions, and later his Dot paintings.
Roger Brown
Roger Brown’s extensive collection of art––a mélange of objects from many cultures and genres––is preserved as an artists’ museum in an 1880s storefront building, modified by Brown into a studio, residence/collection, and garden, reflecting his aesthetic and suiting the needs of this late 20th century artist. Like stepping into the artist’s mind, the RBSC is a kaleidoscopic experience of objects arranged by Brown into a visual gesamtkunstwerk.
Wharton Esherick
Wharton Esherick is considered one of the most important furniture designers of the twentieth century. His home and studio, built and expanded over a period of 40 years, reflects the Esherick’s evolving style, from Arts & Crafts to the Studio Furniture Movement. Left as it was when he lived and worked there, the complex of buildings display Esherick’s genius for designing for human comfort, enjoyment, and use. Esherick considered his studio his autobiography. Visitors interact with the space and touch the wooden sculpture and furniture.