Realism

James Fitzgerald
,
Rockwell Kent
,
Alice Kent Stoddard
Monhegan has been an artists’ destination since the 1850s, and in the early 1900s Rockwell Kent built a house and studio, owned later by James Fitzgerald. The studio represents work practice of three significant artists, having also been used by Alice Kent Stoddard, and the sites serve as touchstones to Monhegan’s multi-generational art colony.
John F. Peto Studio MuseumIsland Heights, NJ
John Frederick Peto
This is the home and studio of John Frederick Peto, the nineteenth century still–life painter and master of the trompe l’oeil style. Following a multi-year preservation project completed in 2011, the Peto-designed house, studio, and gardens are now presented as they looked during his lifetime. Visitors can compare the very furniture and artifacts that Peto owned with the paintings and photographs in which they appear.
Augustus Saint-Gaudens
This 190-acre site features the home, studios, and gardens of Augustus Saint-Gaudens, one of America’s greatest sculptors. More than 100 of the sculptor’s artworks are exhibited in the galleries and on the grounds. The natural beauty of mountains and forest inspired Saint-Gaudens. As you stand on the porch looking across the fields toward the mountains beyond, you also can feel the special quality of place that allowed Saint-Gaudens’ artistic vision to flourish.
N. C. Wyeth
N. C. Wyeth spent much of his life and career here as one of the most successful illustrators of the first half of the 20th century. Experience the studio where Wyeth created many of his memorable works of art, and the home where he and his wife Carolyn raised their extraordinarily creative children. The dramatic space in which Wyeth worked reflects the robust, outsized personality that shaped his art. Standing in the main studio, one can easily imagine the great illustrator at work, creating characters that would become icons for generations of readers.
Andrew Wyeth
A converted schoolhouse, this is the primary studio of Andrew Wyeth, in continual use from 1940 until shortly before the artist’s death in January, 2009. The studio is the center of Wyeth’s Pennsylvania world, the rich microcosm that inspired and nourished his art.
style: Realismtype of art: Tempera Painting, Watercolor

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