Watercolor

Charles Ephraim Burchfield
Between the ages of 5 to 28 (1898-1921), Charles Burchfield lived in this house with his widowed mother and five siblings. Here he originated his distinctive watercolor style that seems to visualize the vibrations of nature.
Andrew Wyeth
A converted schoolhouse, this is the primary studio of Andrew Wyeth, in continual use from 1940 until shortly before the artist’s death in January, 2009. The studio is the center of Wyeth’s Pennsylvania world, the rich microcosm that inspired and nourished his art.
style: Realismtype of art: Tempera Painting, Watercolor
Doris Andrews
,
Sperry Andrews
,
Julian Alden Weir
,
Dorothy Weir Young
,
Mahonri Mackintosh Young
Weir Farm National Historic Site, the only National Park Service site dedicated to American painting, was home to three generations of American artists. Today, the 60-acre park, which includes the Weir House, Weir and Young Studios, barns, gardens, and Weir Pond, is one of the nation’s finest remaining landscapes of American art.
Vance Kirkland
The Kirkland Museum of Fine & Decorative Art, housed in an historic Arts and Crafts style building, displays the work of abstract painter Vance Kirkland in vignettes composed of artwork by other Colorado artists, and a major collection of international decorative art from the modern era. Vance Kirkland’s studio space regularly inspires exclamations of awe from visitors, who are able to see his painting table and the straps Kirkland sometimes used to suspend himself above his paintings to create his large oil paint and water compositions, and later his Dot paintings.
Winslow Homer
Winslow Homer spent his final decades living and working in this rustic structure, perched on Maine’s rocky coast, where he created powerful images of crashing surf and humankind’s struggles against the elements—paintings that are widely considered among the greatest masterpieces of American art. The Winslow Homer Studio provides an intimate experience of the place that inspired Homer’s most celebrated marine paintings. Visitors walk through the spaces in which he lived and worked, and see the ever-changing natural drama of the ocean crashing against the rocky shore.

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