Directory

  • John F. Peto Studio MuseumIsland Heights, NJ
    John F. Peto
    This is the home and studio of John Frederick Peto, the nineteenth century still–life painter and master of the trompe l’oeil style. Following a multi-year preservation project completed in 2011, the Peto-designed house, studio, and gardens are now presented as they looked during his lifetime. Visitors can compare the very furniture and artifacts that Peto owned with the paintings and photographs in which they appear.
  • Judd FoundationNew York, NY
    Donald Judd
    From 1968 until his death in 1994, the sculptor Donald Judd used this 1870 cast-iron loft building as his home and studio. Here he had the opportunity to demonstrate his ideas about art installation. Judd’s use of the building is seen as part of the rise of the SoHo artistic community in New York City.
  • Vance Kirkland
    The Kirkland Museum of Fine & Decorative Art, housed in an historic Arts and Crafts style building, displays the work of abstract painter Vance Kirkland in vignettes composed of artwork by other Colorado artists, and a major collection of international decorative art from the modern era. Vance Kirkland’s studio space regularly inspires exclamations of awe from visitors, who are able to see his painting table and the straps Kirkland sometimes used to suspend himself above his paintings to create his large oil paint and water compositions, and later his Dot paintings.
  • Russel Wright
    Manitoga is the modern home, studio and 75-acre woodland garden of mid-20th century American industrial designer, Russel Wright (1904-1976). Once a ravaged industrial site, Wright transformed Manitoga into a place of extraordinary beauty.
  • Clementine Hunter
    African American folk artist Clementine Hunter (1887-1988), who lived and worked for 75 years at Melrose Plantation, attracted the attention of the world with her colorful memory paintings of life on a rural southern plantation during the first half of the 20th century. She worked at night by the light of a kerosene lantern, in a simple wooden cabin, located in the shadow of the plantation’s Big House. In these humble circumstances, she found her talent and made an unlikely and extraordinary career as an artist.
  • N. C. Wyeth
    N. C. Wyeth spent much of his life and career here as one of the most successful illustrators of the first half of the 20th century. Experience the studio where Wyeth created many of his memorable works of art, and the home where he and his wife Carolyn raised their extraordinarily creative children. The dramatic space in which Wyeth worked reflects the robust, outsized personality that shaped his art. Standing in the main studio, one can easily imagine the great illustrator at work, creating characters that would become icons for generations of readers.
  • Frederic E. Church
    Olana is a 250-acre artist-designed landscape with a Persian-inspired house at its summit, embracing unrivaled panoramic views of the vast Hudson River Valley. The eminent Hudson River School painter Frederic Edwin Church designed Olana, his family home, studio, and estate as an integrated environment embracing architecture, art, landscape, and conservation ideals.
  • Lee Krasner
    ,
    Jackson Pollock
    The former home and studio of two of America’s foremost abstract painters, a National Historic Landmark, preserves the environment that inspired them and contains evidence of their creative processes. Wearing special padded slippers, visitors walk on the studio floor covered with the brilliant colors and rhythmic gestures found in Pollock’s masterpieces. On the studio walls, evidence of Krasner’s dynamic painting technique is visible.
  • James Fitzgerald
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    Rockwell Kent
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    Alice Kent Stoddard
    Monhegan has been an artists’ destination since the 1850s, and in the early 1900s Rockwell Kent built a house and studio, owned later by James Fitzgerald. The studio represents work practice of three significant artists, having also been used by Alice Kent Stoddard, and the sites serve as touchstones to Monhegan’s multi-generational art colony.
  • Roger Brown
    Roger Brown’s extensive collection of art––a mélange of objects from many cultures and genres––is preserved as an artists’ museum in an 1880s storefront building, modified by Brown into a studio, residence/collection, and garden, reflecting his aesthetic and suiting the needs of this late 20th century artist. Like stepping into the artist’s mind, the RBSC is a kaleidoscopic experience of objects arranged by Brown into a visual gesamtkunstwerk.

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