Sculpture

Doris Andrews
,
Sperry Andrews
,
Julian Alden Weir
,
Dorothy Weir Young
,
Mahonri Mackintosh Young
Weir Farm National Historic Site, the only National Park Service site dedicated to American painting, was home to three generations of American artists. Today, the 60-acre park, which includes the Weir House, Weir and Young Studios, barns, gardens, and Weir Pond, is one of the nation’s finest remaining landscapes of American art.
Judd FoundationNew York, NY
Donald Clarence Judd
From 1968 until his death in 1994, the sculptor Donald Judd used this 1870 cast-iron loft building as his home and studio. Here he had the opportunity to demonstrate his ideas about art installation. Judd’s use of the building is seen as part of the rise of the SoHo artistic community in New York City.
Georgia O’Keeffe
The Abiquiu house, garden, and surrounding views were a great source of inspiration to Georgia O’Keeffe. It is a property that she put much time and love into, making it “a house of her own.”
Roger Brown
Roger Brown’s extensive collection of art––a mélange of objects from many cultures and genres––is preserved as an artists’ museum in an 1880s storefront building, modified by Brown into a studio, residence/collection, and garden, reflecting his aesthetic and suiting the needs of this late 20th century artist. Like stepping into the artist’s mind, the RBSC is a kaleidoscopic experience of objects arranged by Brown into a visual gesamtkunstwerk.
Wharton Esherick
Wharton Esherick is considered one of the most important furniture designers of the twentieth century. His home and studio, built and expanded over a period of 40 years, reflects the Esherick’s evolving style, from Arts & Crafts to the Studio Furniture Movement. Left as it was when he lived and worked there, the complex of buildings display Esherick’s genius for designing for human comfort, enjoyment, and use. Esherick considered his studio his autobiography. Visitors interact with the space and touch the wooden sculpture and furniture.

Pages